In All of Our Collective Consciousness:

Whilst in the midst of having a hectic day off running errands, tending to the piles of laundry, tightening-up the P-trap under the kitchen sink and general household zhoozhing, I halt my marching through the living room to watch a scene from a movie on one of the various classic movie channels that are constantly playing, mostly to entertain the dogs, and it’s, Andy Hardy!

“Well, Hello Andy Hardy,” I say aloud to the TV screen, “I kind of liked you Andy. Always such a sap with that, awe-shucks, hands-shoved-into-your-pockets, kicking-the-dirt-off-the-tires-of-your-old-jalopy, thing that you do..."

Mickey Rooney…I mutter to myself. Now that was a character, I continue on with my assessment of Mr. Rooney. Only just died recently too. Damn, he and his latest weird wife were just hawking something or another to the elderly crowd during commercial breaks for the Price Is Right. He lived a long time. A quick Wikki reveals 93 at his death last April. He spent his whole life on screen and there isn’t a time in my life that doesn’t include Mickey Rooney. Always present up until the day he died, always in our collective consciousness.

I found myself recalling Mickey Rooney moments, like the time I caught a late night TV screening when I was about 9 or 10 where he plays a wild Puck in A Midsummer Night's Dream, well worth watching, he and a young Elizabeth Taylor, another, ‘always in our collective consciousness,’ actress starring in National Velvet, and the one that stands out in my mind as I actually saw it at the movie theater, Black Stallion. This also starred Terri Garr, a rather quasi but again another, ‘collective consciousness,’ type personality, working as far back as Star Trek to more recently schilling Hanes underwear.

Several days later I’m reading an article where Drew Barrymore is expressing her idea of beauty and make-up, pushing her own line of beauty products and routine, giving her standard quirky faerie like observations of life and girlishness, when I’m struck by the comparisons of Drew and Mickey’s lives. Both driven and working from the age of 6, both having been in my memory as far back as it goes. She'll probably work until she dies like her grandparents.

Just how many people like this have we in our collective consciousness? People who were professional children and adults that are still working today, my list is populating rather quickly, Jodi Foster, Brooke Shields, Donny Osmond, Stevie Wonder, Harry Connick Jr, Michael Jackson.… What about you? Who are the people or personalities that stand out in your mind that embody this, ‘having always been in our collective consciousness,’ concept?